archiving the day

My name is Phillip. I'm a the associate director of account planning at an "internet" advertising agency called Razorfish in New York. I've worked for retail giants, pro-sports teams, electronics companies, on big american cars, and come up with quite a few inappropriate ideas for male hygiene products. My job entails explaining social concepts and trying to generally be "up" on stuff like trends, people's habits, media, the things that may interest my clients (especially when they have no idea how it would interest them). I live in the East Village and like attend loud concerts as well as quiet ones. Food and drink is also a big part of my off time pursuits.

This is some of the stuff I run into on a daily basis.

"the way to be interesting is to be interested" -R. Davies, Important ad guy

Follow me on twitter: twitter.com/phillipl

My Email: phillip(dot)t(dot)lee(at)gmail(dot)com

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Students who acquire large debts putting themselves through school are unlikely to think about changing society. When you trap people in a system of debt, they can’t afford the time to think. Noam Chomsky (via zeitgeistrama)

(via joshbyard)

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Lettermans Greatest Moments - Dave at Taco Bell (by Matt Biesiada)

Worth all 7 minutes.

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theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.
It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.
Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.

It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.

Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

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(Source: asapscience, via juliasegal)

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citycollaboration:

A pioneering urban economist offers fascinating, even inspiring proof that the city is humanity’s greatest invention and our best hope for the future.
America is an urban nation. More than two thirds of us live on the 3 percent of land that contains our cities. Yet cities get a bad rap: they’re dirty, poor, unhealthy, crime ridden, expensive, environmentally unfriendly… Or are they?
As Edward Glaeser proves in this myth-shattering book, TRIUMPH OF THE CITY, cities are actually the healthiest, greenest, and richest (in cultural and economic terms) places to live. New Yorkers, for instance, live longer than other Americans; heart disease and cancer rates are lower in Gotham than in the nation as a whole. More than half of America’s income is earned in twenty-two metropolitan areas. And city dwellers use, on average, 40 percent less energy than suburbanites.
http://www.triumphofthecity.com
 

citycollaboration:

A pioneering urban economist offers fascinating, even inspiring proof that the city is humanity’s greatest invention and our best hope for the future.

America is an urban nation. More than two thirds of us live on the 3 percent of land that contains our cities. Yet cities get a bad rap: they’re dirty, poor, unhealthy, crime ridden, expensive, environmentally unfriendly… Or are they?

As Edward Glaeser proves in this myth-shattering book, TRIUMPH OF THE CITY, cities are actually the healthiest, greenest, and richest (in cultural and economic terms) places to live. New Yorkers, for instance, live longer than other Americans; heart disease and cancer rates are lower in Gotham than in the nation as a whole. More than half of America’s income is earned in twenty-two metropolitan areas. And city dwellers use, on average, 40 percent less energy than suburbanites.

http://www.triumphofthecity.com

 

(via stoweboyd)

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(Source: auvrealyth, via ratsoff)

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(Source: justinpickard, via stoweboyd)

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